Fun*Cog Team

(c) Viola

Evelien Keizer is professor of English Theoretical Linguistics (“Variation and Cognition”) at the University of Vienna. She obtained her PhD in English Linguistics at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam with a dissertation entitled Refe­rence, predication and (in)definiteness in Functional Grammar (1992), written within the framework of Simon Dik’s Functional Grammar (FG). Since then she has written extensively on the noun phrase (appositions, binominal constructions, pseudopartitives, sort/kind/type constructions, possessives, etc.), resulting in the publication of a monograph on the structural, cognitive and communicative aspects of the English noun phrase (The English noun phrase: the nature of linguistic categorization, 2007, Cambridge University Press). Other areas of interest include information structure, constituent order phenomena, prepositions and verb-preposition constructions, idiomatic expressions, the X is construction, and, more generally, linguistic categorization and the role of gradience in linguistic theory. Most of her research is carried out within the framework of Functional Discourse Grammar (Hengeveld & Mackenzie 2008), a model which, due to its top-down and comprehensive nature, is well-suited to studying the interaction between the different subcomponents of grammar – pragmatics, semantics, morphosyntax and phonology – as well as the role of cognition and context in the formulation of linguistic utterances. However, despite a career-long commitment to functionalism, she is also interested in other theoretical models and approaches (functional, cognitive and generative) and in particular in how insights from these various approaches may supplement each other. Her current research centres on partitive constructions, modification (adverbial and adjectival/participial), extra-clausal constituents (discourse-pragmatic function, placement, prosodic realization), and the nature of interfaces in Functional Discourse Grammar.

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(c) Viola

Lotte Sommerer is a postdoctoral researcher in the field of English linguistics. She studied English and German at the University of Vienna and defended her PhD thesis (supervisors Prof. Dr. Nikolaus Ritt/Prof. Dr. Olga Fischer) on nominal determination and article emergence in Old English in 2011. She is currently a member of the Fun*Cog research team and works on morphosyntactic variation and change in contemporary English, Middle English and Old English. She subscribes to a usage-based, constructional theory of morphosyntax that does full justice to functional and cognitive constraints, takes account of variation and gives equal weight to form and function. In her work she attempts to factor in the frequency of linguistic surface forms and constructional similarity/relatedness (in form or function) in order to explain the shape of and changes in a linguistic system. She is especially interested in theoretical models of grammar (especially CxG), the English Noun Phrase (nominal determination, binominal constructions,…), Form-Function Mapping, Categorization, Gradience,Grammaticalization & Constructionalization. Moreover, she is also interested in Typology, Cognitive Linguistics, First Language Acquisition and the Evolution of Language.  

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(c) Viola

Zlatan Kojadinović is a prae doc assistant at the English Department of the University of Vienna, where he also completed his MA degree in English linguistics in 2018. His MA research concerned the description of the English noun phrase and restrictive apposition, its discourse functions, definite and indefinite reference and specificity. His current research interest lies in the complex relations between the syntactic, prosodic and semantico-pragmatic properties of certain parenthetical constructions such as comment clauses, adverbials, nominal apposition, vocatives, etc. In his PhD project, he aims to explore to what extent prosodic phrasing can be accounted for in relation to semantic (truth-conditional) and syntactic features, and to what extent other discourse-pragmatic factors (systematically) influence prosodic realization. The theoretical framework of the study is Functional Discourse Grammar.

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Fun*Cog Graz

Gunther Kaltenböck
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Elnora ten Wolde
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Former Team Members

Arne Lohmann
Barbara Soukup